Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket

Listen to the past interview with Robert Bateman on FM 105.9 The Region



Watch the past interview with Select Art Galleries on What She Said


Hardwood Forest slip-case cover 1st Edition

Hard Cover accompanied by the
"Gray Jay" print.
Dimensions: 13" x 15" Price $85 CDN

Midnight Black Wolf slip-case cover 1st Edition

Hard Cover accompanied by the "Gray Jay" print and a detail of the "Midnight Black Wolf" print.
Dimensions: 13" x 15" Price $125 CDN
This is, in Bateman's words: his most charismatic piece. It will be a subscription edition, signed and serialized. Reserve your copy today.

Andy Everson: Star Wars art with a meaningful story

As Star Wars fans worldwide gear up for the release of Episode VIII: The Last Jedi, we are geared up too, but for a different reason.

About Andy Everson

Hailing from British Columbia's K’ómoks First Nation, Andy is an artist known for using Star Wars characters to raise awareness of political issues facing aboriginal people.
The artist paints Northwest Coast aboriginal designs on characters like Darth Vader and a Stormtrooper as a way to bring misgivings about various issues to light.
Not only is his artwork brilliant and beautiful, it gives a voice to important issues, and tells a meaningful story.
We are honoured to feature two of Andy's limited edition Star Wars prints in our gallery, as well as a couple of other striking pieces.

Defiance by Andy Everson



Limited edition print using the giclée method of printmaking | Image size 14.5" x 19"

“My first ancestor, ‘Na̱mukustolis, came to earth wearing the feathered garment of the Great Blue Heron. Upon arriving, he took off his bird skins to reveal his inner human form. Later, when ‘Na̱mukustolis met the great Ḵ̓aniḵilakw, the two had an epic battle—transforming each other into ducks and kingfishers and mountains. Knowing that he would like to help out his people into the future, ‘Na̱mukustolis ultimately chose to become the river Gwa’ni. Unlike rocks that would crumble and wood that would rot, the river would continue to flow and provide salmon for the ‘Na̱mg̱is people. In this way, ‘Na̱mukustolis was defiant. He chose to do what was best for his people—he literally laid down for them for all of eternity.

Following the lead of our ancestors, our people have continued to remain defiant. We have had everything thrown at us and we have persevered. We’ve dealt with disease, the Indian Act, relocation, reservations, the potlatch ban, residential schools, the “Sixties scoop”, inter-generational abuse and widespread addiction. They have harmed all of us, but we have remained defiant. In response, our culture and way of life has changed and adapted. We have transformed which in itself is an act of defiance.

We now live in an age where we must balance modern life with traditional teachings. An age where we must choose between the trappings of a capitalist society and of one steeped in giving and sharing. An age where we’re compelled to miss work in order to potlatch. An age where we drive cars and use petroleum-based products and feel compelled to say “NO!” to pipelines. An age where the only salmon some of us see is in the grocery store…and it’s farmed. If it is one thing that our ancestors taught us, it was to remain defiant: to use our voice when there is injustice; to use our actions when they are sorely needed; and to use our hearts, minds and consciousness in order to make the important decisions.

These decisions we face are not easy ones. Sometimes it’s just plain easier to “Netflix and chill” than to be defiant and stand up for what you believe. In this day and age—as much as ever—we need to be the people our ancestors would want us to be."

~ Andy Everson

Rise by Andy Everson



Limited edition print using the giclée method of printmaking | Image size 14.5" x 19"

"In myth times, Umeł was known as “Chief-of-the-Ancients” or Raven personified. He was at once both trickster and transformer. During these times of immense change, turbulence, and darkness, Umeł brought light into the world. Because we never had any rivers or streams at that time, Umeł emptied out a sea lion’s bladder full of water and thus created the river systems throughout our territory. He did this so that the salmon could return up stream and feed the people. Umeł also instructed people on how to use cedar bark and how to make clothes and blankets. In memory of this, our leaders continue to give feasts and potlatches to this day: distributing salmon and blankets to share our wealth with our neighbours.

In the old days, our leaders were taught from birth on how to act as a noble person…on how to best serve the people…on how to follow the example of giving set forth by Umeł. They were instructed about the great burden of responsibility that comes with being a leader. Being so fundamentally connected to all the people in their care, they had no choice but to lift their people up. They were taught that they would rise or fall alongside the people.

Slowly over time, this type of leadership has decayed. Whether driven by greed, ego, ambition or simply apathy, some of our leaders have journeyed down a dark path. They have come to seek personal gain over community interest. While most leaders begin their journeys with good hearts, not all are able to maintain this true course.

Where does this leave us today? We are left gazing into the eyes of our would-be leaders…waiting for them to remove the mask…waiting for them to put their community first. We want leaders who are not afraid to wear the mantle of Umeł…those who are able to bring light into the darkness…those who are driven to lead their people to Rise!"

~ Andy Everson

Angry Raven by Andy Everson



Limited edition print using the giclée method of printmaking | Image size 11" x 17"

"We sometimes see them as quick flashes of black in the forest. Other times we hear their resonant caw echoing in the woods. Sometimes they’re persistent and mischievous and other times they’re simply mysterious. Such is the way of the great trickster–the raven.

Amongst the tribes on the Northwest coast, our history goes far beyond our present-day encounters with this bird. All of our peoples have tales that go back to the beginning of time and offer up the raven as a main protagonist. There are stories where he opens up the box of daylight and releases the sun into the sky. There are other myths where he starts off as a white bird and ends up turning black through his crazy exploits.

Amongst the K’ómoks people, the raven is known for his ridiculous claims. He has a propensity for saying that he can do anything anyone else can do. Through a series of events and outrageous stunts, the raven invariably ends ups embarrassed and in great pain. He doesn’t really learn, though–he only ends up angry and continues to repeat the cycle.

For cultures around the world, the trickster–in whatever form he or she may take–is an incredibly valuable and important figure. Through misdeeds and misadventures, the world is most often set right. While we may be left with an angry raven, the world is gifted a culture hero."

~ Andy Everson

Eclipse by Andy Everson



Limited edition print using the giclée method of printmaking | Image size 17" x 17.1"

"I remember as a child walking home from school afraid to look up into the sky. In the lead up to that solar eclipse, we had been bombarded with warnings about the potential effects of directly peering at the celestial event. Knowing that I could go blind, I opted not to look at the sky at all. Almost forty years later, I finally got my chance to experience part of this rare event.

No matter where you were on the path of this year’s total eclipse, if you saw any of it, it affected you. Though my homelands only got to witness a partial eclipse, it was memorable. It reminds you of your place in the world—how small we really are. How our place in the cosmos is so infinitesimally tiny, that we shouldn’t matter. But we do. From the largest solar system to the smallest quark, we help make up the universe.

My ancestors called total eclipses “na̱ǥa̱kw” or “swallowed” in our language as they believed that the sun was being consumed by a giant creature. In response, each person in the village would put old clothing, mats or hair on an enormous fire in order to smoke the creature out. While the fire burned they cried out with requests for the creature to hux̱w’id, or “vomit”. The disgorgement of the sun meant success on their part. It was their way of reminding themselves that what they do really does make a difference. In these days of immense climate change, we must reminds ourselves that, yes, we do effect change…and this tiny blue dot we call earth really does matter."

~ Andy Everson

Framed and Ready to Hang $190 to $270

  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket



Other Available Prints

  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket
  • Select Art Galleries, Ontario, Newmarket

Select Art Galleries  l  16686 Yonge St, Newmarket, ON L3X 3AI  l  Phone: 905-895-3002
Email:info@selectart.ca